In making music, what is that that causes me to adhere to Twin Peaks, thematically and/or stylistically? It’s very simple: Twin Peaks has become modern day shorthand for cracks in the veneer, blackness slowly spreading in water, darkness beneath the surface of things. It’s an immediate setter of mood, consistently indicative of something tragic lurking just around the corner. It’s the ennui-moving-to-fear of current living, of economic collapses and ever-present uncertainty and the existential doom of modern life.

For my music, it’s either a barrier or an enticement that this feeling is a prerequisite for entrance, but either way that mood, that “Twin Peaks vibe” that keeps coming up in everything cultural ever lately, is what I want smeared all over my art, myself and my listeners. And it’s apparent many others feel the same way, though I feel the pop-punk band I saw once who used Badalamenti’s Twin Peaks theme as entrance music and those who do things similar to be a bit of a fake-out. Twin Peaks as color, as emotion, as a suit of clothing to wear means something, and that’s to be both expected and respected. Laura was pushed to her breaking point, and as both a listener and a creator that’s what I want–to be taken to the edge and possibly not brought back. I choose to experience art created on that same fringe, psychotic disco and death ambient and Rust from True Detective

i wrote about twin peaks + mood + art  (via russmarshalek)

popculturebrain:

First Clip: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy' - Aug 1

THIS HAPPENED

THIS HAPPENED

adventuresbk:

HERE WE GO

adventuresbk:

HERE WE GO

laughterkey:

Audrey Horne in Twin Peaks Season 1 Episode: The One Armed Man

I’ve always meant to ask, but this bathroom was the inspiration for buzzfeed’s whole aesthetic, right?

humansofnewyork:

"Let me tell you what’s happening to me. I’m on the PTA at my child’s school, the Secondary School of Journalism in Park Slope. I’m currently advocating on behalf of my child, and seventeen other children whose parents don’t speak English. These kids are from Ecuador, Peru, El Salvador, Dominican Republic, everywhere. These kids have all done very well on their Regent’s exams— I’m talking 90/95th percentile. Very smart kids. They were on their way toward qualifying for an Advanced Regents government scholarship,that would give their parents badly needed money to help in their education. But the fine print of that scholarship says the children need three full years of a foreign language. 
And the principal at the school FIRED the Spanish teacher. She is not hiring another foreign language teacher for an entire year, effectively disqualifying all these kids from that scholarship they need. When we try to talk with her about it, she acts like she doesn’t owe us an explanation. When we try to call the Board of Education, they tell us to put it in writing. They get us all excited. They have us think if we write a nice letter, and use good grammar, and use all the correct punctuation, something will happen. Meanwhile another year passes, and nothing. And the kids don’t get their scholarship. You know something like this would never happen at a nice Manhattan school like Stuyvesant.
We’ve got a new mayor and a new chancellor. So we aren’t blaming them. But they need to know how impossible they’ve made it to help our kids. Trying to get something fixed in these schools is like praying to some false God. You call and email hoping that God is listening, and nothing happens. Meanwhile the kids suffer. All these parents that I’m representing are good, simple people. They say: ‘Don’t worry Annette, God is going to fix it. God will make it right.’ I love them. And I love God. But I tell them: ‘God won’t fix it! We’ve got to fix it!’”

humansofnewyork:

"Let me tell you what’s happening to me. I’m on the PTA at my child’s school, the Secondary School of Journalism in Park Slope. I’m currently advocating on behalf of my child, and seventeen other children whose parents don’t speak English. These kids are from Ecuador, Peru, El Salvador, Dominican Republic, everywhere. These kids have all done very well on their Regent’s exams— I’m talking 90/95th percentile. Very smart kids. They were on their way toward qualifying for an Advanced Regents government scholarship,that would give their parents badly needed money to help in their education. But the fine print of that scholarship says the children need three full years of a foreign language. 

And the principal at the school FIRED the Spanish teacher. She is not hiring another foreign language teacher for an entire year, effectively disqualifying all these kids from that scholarship they need. When we try to talk with her about it, she acts like she doesn’t owe us an explanation. When we try to call the Board of Education, they tell us to put it in writing. They get us all excited. They have us think if we write a nice letter, and use good grammar, and use all the correct punctuation, something will happen. Meanwhile another year passes, and nothing. And the kids don’t get their scholarship. You know something like this would never happen at a nice Manhattan school like Stuyvesant.

We’ve got a new mayor and a new chancellor. So we aren’t blaming them. But they need to know how impossible they’ve made it to help our kids. Trying to get something fixed in these schools is like praying to some false God. You call and email hoping that God is listening, and nothing happens. Meanwhile the kids suffer. All these parents that I’m representing are good, simple people. They say: ‘Don’t worry Annette, God is going to fix it. God will make it right.’ I love them. And I love God. But I tell them: ‘God won’t fix it! We’ve got to fix it!’”